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Sermon for the Tenth Sunday after Trinity

25th Aug 2019


Sermon for The Tenth Sunday of Trinity Year C

 

“What you have come to is Mount Zion and the city of the living God”  Hebrews 12. 22.

 

 

The wonder of modern travel is that we can experience the great cities of the world as never before. They have all become so accessible. It now becomes possible to clamber aboard a train from King’s Cross Station, a few hundred metres away from here, and find ourselves in the centre of Paris in the space of a little more than two hours!  The visiting of other countries at shorter and longer distances  invites an experience of ‘a change of air’ and the experience of a different dialect or a different language, history, architecture and mood. Such changes ‘take us out of ourselves’ and reinvigorate us.

 

This morning’s second reading is taken from the Letter to the Hebrews, where we arrive at a new and revitalizing city destination. The writer sets out the provision for the transformation of the Christian community as it was emerging out of its Jewish inheritance.  Now, suddenly, in Jesus Christ was envisaged as a divine society. Mount Zion is not just located as a former place name or destination, but now becomes what the writer calls ‘the heavenly Jerusalem’, promising a radical social inclusion never before seen. These are the characteristics of a divine society. The former Archbishop of Canterbury, Michael Ramsey, twenty centuries later was to speak of the Church of God on earth as “A divine society, with Christ as the glory in the midst of it and the Holy Spirit as work within it”. In this new city, the city of the living God we are reminded that an understanding of God’s ways does not proceed merely out of our minds or wills. As Tolstoy once said, ‘It is not the mind which helps us to understand God – it is life itself’.

 

It is a mark of the genius of the Church of England that it is divided up into parishes. Each one of these parishes has a church. Each church represents a worshipping community and a whole slice of life. For each parish, as for each church there is a distinctive character. Someone has remarked that in there is ‘a church for everybody’. It is some time ago now that men and women might church crawl and find churches they had never before visited always open, even if empty. Entering upon the apparent emptiness of a church there is so often the energy in the air which is the atmosphere of prayer. Then there are the many signs of human activity with notices of social events and prayers put up for churches in other parts of the world. Churches have become in recent history places of social ingathering and not just religious places. They aim now to be inclusive of the communities they serve, whether they consist of regular churchgoers or not. In this way contemporary churches fulfil Christ’s own mandate, where the Sabbath stands for healing and the idea of ‘the city of the living God’ one which is intended to be a place and an experience of joyful interaction and communion.

 

In our own church we find ourselves this late August preparing to welcome new tenants to our crypt, a drama school which auditions and supports budding young actors, many of them from poorer backgrounds. We are also planning and preparing for the installation of the Moon, a digital facsimile of the Moon which will cover most of the chancel area and attract may people from within our own church orbit and beyond it. The experience will be truly interactive and awesome. Churches like ours need no longer feel restrained by the tradition of Sunday worship alone. The model for growing churches will place the onus on us to allow our plant to be ‘turned inside out’ in the service of the wider community. While we do this, we remain a worshipping, praying community whose heart lies with and in God in Jesus Christ. Christ’s is the dynamic we embrace, at all times, and in all ways.

 

We at Holy Cross are fortunate to be a church in the heart of one of the most happening places in London. The quality of our life as a Christian Church is enriched in interaction with others. Each fulfils his or her own so-creative potential in the one interaction. It in this vein that Jesus heals the crippled woman on the Sabbath. We are to know in this way ‘where he is coming from’. His Kingdom is one which is expressed in freedom. “What you have come to” responds the writer to the Hebrews “…is Mount Zion, and the city of the living God”.

 

There are some American expressions which are not easily translated into (proper!) English language but which nonetheless put things more succinctly and say things in a much more laid back way while conveying the real essence of things. One of these is a favourite of mine:

 

“We just get to hang out”

 

Yea, ‘we just get to hang out’. But for the writer to the Hebrews, this is Christian teaching about the deep and prayerful quality of community life that it expresses. And the influence of God runs through its life as a golden thread. Churches ‘hang out’ in a particular way and the strong bonds of friendship they encourage are mediated in corporate prayer and holy communion:

 

If you came this way,

Taking any route, starting from anywhere,

At any time or at any season,

It would always be the same: you would have to put off

Sense and notion. You are not here to verify,

Instruct yourself, or inform curiosity

Or carry report. You are here to kneel

Where prayer has been valid.

 

 

God has brought us to this place, the City of the living God, a place of radical inclusiveness, of generous welcome, and of the wonder that resides in the communal and particularly in its capacity to look both within and outside itself.  But its life is sure. Christ has made it so. It is the divine society , with Christ as the glory in the midst of it and the transforming and liberating Spirit at work within it.