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Sermon for the Second Sunday of Lent 2019

17th Mar 2019


Sermon for the Second Sunday of Lent Year C 2019

 

“Observe those who live according to the example you have in us” Philippians 3.17

 

 

In the Gospels, the very word ‘Herod’ stands for the evil enemy. It may seem crude at first that we speak in this way. But Lent sets up a progress which is the unfolding of the saving Passion of Jesus Christ, and in it, much animated opposition and death dealing violence is to be revealed. Our Gospel this morning continues from last Sunday, in which Christ countermands the wiles of the devil in the wilderness. In today’s Gospel narrative Jesus must confront the world’s evil forces, in which the devil resides. One of the devil’s names is ‘the ancient enemy’. And there is a real sense in the Passion narrative in which Christ’s Cross – the ultimate emanation of God’s sacrificial love is to have its respondent both in its willing acceptance and equally in its violent rejection. In his Passion, Jesus must contend with these forces and win through.

 

The city of Jerusalem for Jesus is the place of impressive religion but also the place of the doing to death of the truth tellers, the prophets. Jesus gazes over the Kidron Valley at the great city and weeps over it and longs for the emergence of its true and undivided humanity. He likens this hope to the hen as she gathers her brood of chicks under her wing. In using this gentle pastoral image amid the forces set against him, we come to know that the journey which Jesus is to make is truly  epic. Jesus coming as ‘God’s great goodness’ unleashes an opposite kind of reaction – an evil opposition. Herod is an obviously key for evil  in the Gospel account, but the enemy also lies in the human character and its negative capacities, particularly those which collude with the devil to divide, to maim and to destroy. The power of Jesus lies in his capacity to remain the compassionate and human healer that he is in the face of real opposition and to remain God’s faithful Son.  His coming is also an exorcism. Simeon’s prophecy  reminds us that in Jesus ‘the secret thoughts of many will be laid bare’.

 

The two pieces of news from the other side of the world this week, of the sentencing of a Roman Catholic Cardinal for child abuse and the killing of Muslim worshippers in New Zealand make up this category of evil. Hannah Arendt famously spoke of a ‘the banality of evil’ and in the context of these events of there lies the simple fact of great destruction wrought by individuals who last week may have been sitting watching the TV and drinking a cup of coffee; their ordinariness or even their precise status a perfect kind of camouflage. One of the perpetrators Brenton Tarant, described himself in his’ manifesto of hate’ as ‘a regular white man from a regular family’. In both these instances, however, There is the attempt to place a dagger in the ordinary hearts of persons at worship in holy places. The violence is the more apparent as it took place in religious and peaceable environments.

 

It is no easy matter to live with the unsettling issues that emerge out of these atrocities and to respond in a way that is truly responsive and effective. The issues are hugely challenging. As we return to the Passion of Jesus Christ in the Gospel message of Lent, we find One who is at all times working and speaking for the reconciliation of opposites, One who is not swayed by the forces of evil that surround him. Jesus’ whole sacrificial offering is the one which has the power to reconcile us with ourselves and to God. It is done as one single strong act of constant love. This reconciliation is achieved by his Church in the passionate living out of the Christian Faith and the remaining faithful to Christ’s message of love.

 

It may often seem as though the outward means by which the world sees Christian or religious faith is overlaid solely by formal acts of worship. In the West, it has been common for observes to state that the Christian religion, manifested by church going is in sharp decline and therefore become increasingly irrelevant. But this is overly objective view is not as important as the fact of the practice and the faithful commitment to the Christian Faith on the part of the many. Of the desire to come to worship and to make that large space available in the longing for God and for that reconciled world for which his Son Jesus Christ came to live and die. The practice of the Christian religion for the many is a commitment to honour and love that which makes sense of our lives and our world and our true nature. It enkindles a spirit of gratitude. The view of the Church or for that matter practising Islam may be seen by many in the west as too particular or decidedly peripheral, but the real point is that religious practices which espouse a view of humanity from a place which is compassionate, respectful and spiritually grounded come in fact to represent the world’s  great beating heart. It is our God given vocation to stand up for the Christian Gospel of radical, sacrificial and expensive love and to live, however falteringly and imperfectly, according to the God-given example that we are being given, in Jesus’ Name and in mindfulness of his Glorious Passion.  

 

Amen.

 

 

 

 



Sermon for the First Sunday of Lent

10th Mar 2019


The First Sunday of Lent Year C 

 

“The Beginning of Lent and the Necessary Temptation in the Wilderness”

 

Jesus, full of the holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led by The Holy Spirit in the wilderness, where for forty days he was tempted by the devil.  Luke 41, 2.

 

At the beginning of the Lenten season the Church helps us to we see the Christian Faith from a more searching and interrogating point of view. But it is God who is doing the searching and interrogating! This is suggested as we are sent into the wilderness with Christ. Of course, here in London, we are thousands of miles away from the kind of sandy, rocky desert which Jesus inhabited. We should remember too, that in First Century Palestine, the desert was never very far away from the town. Even today it is amazing how soon on leaving the city of Jerusalem you meet the desert only as it were a few miles down the road. But for Jesus then and for us now, the idea of the desert place still worked on the human mind. It was seen as a place and an experience in which one might find clarity of thought and vision untrammelled by the distractions of town life, but equally it was a place of unremitting intensity and harshness. It was for all these reasons that in the life of the early Church, the so-called desert mothers and fathers made their homes in caves and practised rigorous lives of prayer and self-denial. The idea of the wilderness or desert is the one which suggests severe physical and spiritual challenge. For Jesus’ Jewish contemporaries, this challenge was inscribed in the people’s memory in the ancient search for The Promised Land, and of Moses leading the people through great travail to a place of final sanctuary. But before this could happen, they understood that Moses entered Mount Sinai for forty days and nights before receiving the tablets of the Law. Jesus’ habitation of the wilderness over this forty day period, the period we call Lent, is set alongside the Giving of the Law and begs the question of what kind of new law or provision does Jesus offer?

 

The Gospels never deny the abiding truth of the Old Testament tradition. But their message is plain on one basic point. This is that all Jewish scripture and its promise now receives its fulfilment in Jesus Christ, and in the manner of his whole being: his teaching, his actions, his example and above all in the God-givenness of his destiny. We soon come to know that this destiny will end in his freely going to his own death. By these  means, we come to understand Jesus temptations in the wilderness over a forty day period as a movement of divine love. Jesus’ ministry is not automatic, it is offered in fll consciousness and with the guidance of God’s Holy Spirit. The desert experience is an extreme form of personal and spiritual testing. But it is also a gentle period of stepping aside, of waiting, of contemplation and of preparation. If Jesus is to be Christ the Saviour this testing must take him to the very limits of his own estimation of things and beyond them. There must be an engagement with the evil that may always assert itself on other side of the good. The acknowledgement, is made that even in the desert, there exists the light and the shadow component in the mind of Man. There is the need to understand these things and, acknowledging the burden that human freedom of choice often sets upon us, of the importance of coming to know the good and of deciding in its favour. In his respect we may see the temptations in the wilderness as establishing the right kind of moral frequency through which Christ overcomes the ancient divisions the threaten to divide and separate us, and which unsuccessfully threaten his intention.

 

The Temptation in the Wilderness also assumes the existence of the Devil. These days, The Devil is no longer in the forefront of the Christian mind. The expunging of the idea of the Devil or of the existence of evil from consciousness (apart from in horror movies) leaves a vacant gap which leaves our minds dangerously closed off to the existence of the demonic and the fact of evil. A full consciousness of the power of evil and of evil influence is essential for a balanced view of our world, where the simple analogy of light and its casting shadow allows us to see that as humans we want to see ourselves as people who wish good to prevail, but we battle with forces which are malign, cruel and inhuman. It is certain for Jesus that in order to enter the human condition as it is found, he must understand the nature of human wickedness and frailty, and in the temptations by Satan, the recourse to self-aggrandisement, spiritual pride and self-will. The devil tempts us and tries to tempt Jesus and what he believes to be his weakest spot. The devil’s temptations are not crude but subtle – he wishes to appeal to any misguided motives Jesus might have. Jesus has rejected the devil’s temptations in the wilderness but he and we are introduced into the kind of world Jesus has come to save – one which both welcomes and condemns him.

 

The Church has always wanted Christians to instruct themselves in the way of self-knowledge. In doing this it observes the essentially divided nature of the human condition. But at the same time lies the discovery  of the certainty of the mercy and forgiveness of God through the honest recognition of our condition: The Prayer Book Confession expresses it well : “We have done those things which we ought not to have done and we have not done those things which we ought to have done and there is no health in us. But thou O God, have mercy upon us…”  Jesus is in the wilderness to tell it like it is. To remind us that there is much to understand about the human condition in all its complexity and waywardness, but also much to understand and to forgive, both in ourselves and in those around us. The Christian grounding is the one which internalises and keeps them in heart and mind according to what has been called ‘the ground of our being’ and which can see life as containing both light and shadow.

 

Finally, The Wilderness Experience is the one which is seen as the preparation for Christ’s ministry. It is assumed that the world of men and women is that strange mixture of light and shadow. If the Christian faith is to provide that way of looking at the world which offers humankind ‘a way back’ to our created splendour, then Jesus Christ as the bringer of new healing must be the one who has encountered all the worst that the world can throw at him, and prevailed. In all this, we are being given a powerful reminder his morning that in Jesus we have a Saviour who has gone ahead of us to restore us into the image and likeness of God himself. We too, this Lent are being called to that place where he has gone before.

 

 

 

The words from ‘Praise to the Holiest in the Height’  John Henry Newman.

 

O wisest love! that flesh and blood,

Which did in Adam fail,

Should strive afresh against the foe,

Should strive and should prevail.



Sermon for Ash Wednesday 2019

6th Mar 2019


A S H   W E D N E S D A Y   S E R M O N

The appeal that we make in Christ’s name is : Be reconciled to God.

1 Corinthians 5.21.

 

 

Ash Wednesday comes to us as the offering of an invitation that we find difficult to accept. It is the invitation to enter a wilderness and to meet Christ there. This is the desert which is founded on nothing, an empty place. It is the place which invites the emptying of self. And it is in the emptying of self that we may discover in Jesus a way back to God, and our reconciliation with Him. And so the desert becomes the place of utmost Christian instruction. It invites the offering of ourselves to advance in the hope which God has set before us. We are not offering who we think we are, what we do, or what life demands of us but ourselves only.  Lent asks us this question: Is my life based on the satisfaction of a myriad of human desires, and if so, how is it that such satisfactions have not entirely satisfied? The desert is the place we go to find out why this is so, and we go with Jesus as we acknowledge and experience God’s generous and sustaining love, forgiveness and restoration. Lent begins here…we may give things up or take things on but the essential call is the one which would recognise that God is before all else.

 

What might we be like if our own wanting were to issue out of God alone? Christ goes into the desert to decide for God and to reject those things which are not of God. The act of deciding-for-God is vital. We find it written into one of most popular English books ever written: ‘Pilgrim’s Progress’. The overcoming by Jesus of temptation in the wilderness has set Lent upon its centuries old course. It sets us on our way, too. It does this not by the imposition of a whole series of restrictions, even though certain restrictions on our wanting may prove beneficial. It does it in Paul’s appeal that above all things, we should ‘be reconciled to God’, become one in Him, and accept Him as our life’s true meaning and purpose.

 

This morning as we offered ‘ashes to go’ on Euston Road I was aware of the joy certain individuals felt in recognising that the cross of Christ was being shown there on the street and that the anointing with ashes was being offered for Ash Wednesday. The ashes are a simple reminder of the basic nature of our mortality, of the finiteness of our existence. We are to be reminded that ‘we are dust, and unto dust we shall return’. Notice this word ‘imposition’; an unsettling word. As the ashes are imposed upon us there is a call to act. In particular, to act quite apart from what may feed the body but in fact starve or hurt the soul. The Ash Wednesday message cuts to the heart of what we are, mere mortals, but then calls us forward to what God has made us to be. This is liberating as we free ourselves from the imposition of our own wills.

 

I observe two things about this morning’s anointing in the street. Firstly that if the Church makes itself vulnerable and available, then this will be blessed. The street for the Church can be the place of radical witness. Secondly, when we place our trust in God in the Rite of Imposition of Ashes on this first day of Lent, we proclaim the power of the Cross, which lies in and through and above all things and all people in the showing of God’s particular kind of love. What does this love look like? I hear you say. I say, we say in the Church, “It looks like this!”  It looks like a cross made of ashes which reminds us of who we are and draws us closer to what God would have us be”.

 

It may seem strange that the injunction in today’s first reading is one which asks us to hide our piety from others and to wash our faces when Ash Wednesday sees us display on our foreheads the black, ash cross. But this cross is there not to tell the world how pious we are, but of the God we acknowledge. He is over all things, and because he is over all things, our mortality, our own living and dying find their true end in Him. As St Paul reminds us “If we have become on with him in a death like his we will become one with him in a resurrection like his” (Romans 6.3). But for now, on this challenging Ash Wednesday, the Church’s forward progress is well and truly set down.

 

 

Amen.

 

 

Ash Wednesday proffers an invitation that we receive only with reluctance. This is the invitation to come away to a place of deeper knowing through which, through Christ and with Christ and in Christ, we may advance in the hope which he has set before us. It is never too late to make a beginning and to start, with a reminder of our mortality, and then to come to Jesus, the source of all life and meaning. Jesus, the one who emptied himself of all but love…   Henri Nouwen.



Sermon for the Sunday Next before Lent

3rd Mar 2019


Sermon for the Sunday next before Lent Year C

 

“And while he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white”. Luke 9. 29

 

 

The Transfiguration of Christ on the mountain is not for the Gospel writer Luke a theatrical effect, but a reality which introduces notes of awe and of wonder and draws us into itself. For here we are ‘falling into the hands of the living God’. The Transfiguration  is a meeting with the Jesus who has become Christ. It happens right before our eyes, and to see such things is to experience God’s glory. The glory is enveloped in brightness, and yet reveals a terrible secret - of the Christ who is the fulfiller all things, even unto death and resurrection. The secret is disclosed in dazzling white and also within thick shadow and dark cloud. Even though the Feast of the Transfiguration takes place in August, this Gospel reading is purposefully set before us as a key text for the coming of the penitential season of Lent.  In this context, the mountain of Transfiguration is the place of amazing appearances, and yet also of stark realities; of terrible truth. It points to the Cross even as it manifests the glory of God. As we sing the well-known hymn ‘Tis Good Lord to be here’, there is already a strong sense of foreboding:

 

Fulfiller of the past,

Promise of things to be,

We hail Thy body glorified

And our redemption see.

 

This terrible truth-telling in the Transfiguration shows us that there is always the danger of not seeing the other side of things; of the essential gravity of our existence and the seriousness of human suffering, of life as a struggle and of the need for forgiveness and the experience of much pain and adversity. This is the Cross of Jesus and it is our Cross, too. Jesus takes this Cross upon himself and it is the Cross of Jesus which is the glory that God reveals in the mountain-top. This is a strange and difficult kind of glory. It is the one which brings us into contact with the living God. Its message comes as a double-edged sword, the one which the Letter to the Hebrews describes as

 

…piercing to the division of soul and spirit, of joints and marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart…” Hebrews 4.12

 

No wonder then, that this reading is set for the Sunday before Lent. There is no easy consolation offered here. Instead comes the invitation to find our truest humanity in Christ and to find it through  ‘the changes and chances of this fleeting world and of its brokenness’.  This is to begin to be honest with ourselves and toward God. To recognise life’s essential gravity. To begin to find in God that active love and the mercy we need if life is to be transformative.

 

In The Louvre, the French National Art Gallery in Paris, visitors invariably head towards one great painting, The Mona Lisa. She gazes impassively through bullet proof glass and is constantly surrounded by her own paparazzi – with cameras and continuous flashes of blinding white light. She has become like the namesake Madonna, a superstar. It is difficult to get near her. But with all the adulation, one wonders what is going on? What is it that is happening when thousands of tourists take photos constantly? There seems to be a manic rush to record it all, and while the photographer is snapping away to ignore the resonance of what is being photographed and its real presence. The photographer is very unstill. There is the attempt to put an atmosphere or an object in the pocket. To capture it. To possess it. To take it away. The Transfiguration offers us the opposite of the blinding camera flash and the image you can put into your pocket. The appearance of Jesus in white light on the mountain-top is God’s revelation to his people, you and me, of his merciful love. In all we have to do or to suffer, God’s presence lies before us as and with it the promise of his holiness to surround us and to inhabit our inmost being. His face shines to show us the light of the revelation of the fullness of God…What is real is not looked at from exterior vision but from within the truth of what has been revealed…

 

The world is charged with the grandeur of God.

It will flame out, like shining from shook foil.

G M Hopkins

 

But how are we to bear true witness, especially as we approach the beginning of Lent? The Church offers us as individuals a way forward in the practice of self-examination and of sacramental confession. To tell it like it is. Though it has been derided and caricatured and is less practiced by many, its effectiveness is very real. The costliness of our being more honest about what we are and what we do wrong is often too humiliating to bear. But this is a necessary humbling, a Cross, which provides us with an effective remedy. It provides a pathway to the restoration of the soul, often so damaged and maimed by our own essential pride. It is an attempt at an honesty from which new life may emerge. And it is more than matched by the matchless mercy of God. We trivialize this aspect of our lives at great cost to the integrity of the Christian Faith. The Transfiguration opens up for us new channels of grace and renewal of life..  It is what St Paul called

 

The light of the fullness of the revelation of God shining in the face of Jesus Christ”. 2 Corinthians 4.6.

 

It is a revelation of what lies most true for human nature. It provides the marriage between what the Old Prayer Book in its General Thanksgiving called ‘The means of Grace and the hope of glory’. The best introduction to Lent that we have.

 

 

 

A Prayer for the beginning of Lent:

 

Lord Jesus, Our Saviour, let us now come to you:

Our hearts are cold: Lord, warm them with your selfless love.

Our hearts are sinful; cleanse them with your precious blood.

Our hearts are weak; strengthen them with your joyous Spirit.

Our hearts are empty; fill them with your divine presence.

Lord Jesus, our hearts are yours; possess them always and only for yourself.

Amen.

 

 



Sermon for the Third Sunday before Lent

17th Feb 2019


Sermon for the Third Sunday before Lent

 

The Collect for this morning:

 

O Almighty God, who alone canst order the unruly wills and affections of sinful men and women: Grant unto thy people, that they may love the thing which thou commandest, and desire that which thou dost promise; that so, among the sundry and manifold changes of the world, our hearts may surely there be fixed, where true joys are to be found; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

When Christians speak of the heart they are never romantic. The heart for the Christian is the place of decision making, of conversion. The heart is the centre of our personal gravity as it finds that true centre in God. But our Old Testament ready has the human heart as “devious above all else” The so-called beatitudes, blessings given to the ones who come close to God in actions that proceed from a deep roots.

 

Today’s collect asks that we may be given grace to love what God commands and to desire what God promises. This is no romantic or idealised love but the willing response to the love of God in which ‘true joys are to be found’. It is in communion with God that we find our true selves and the true meaning of our lives. Amid the many ‘changes and chances of this fleeting world’, the collect continues in the hope that we may find our true rest in His ‘eternal changelessness’. This teaching calls us to attention. It is a deeply spiritual teaching. It calls for a relationship with God which is  profoundly rooted and committed. This is a far cry from the romantic love which is as we say ‘away with the fairies’.

 

In the call to rooted and grounded love. Scripture reminds us to be persevering and steadfast. Paul reminds the Corinthians that beyond their petty factions, their personal vanity and their worldliness they are, nonetheless ‘God’s field; God’s building.’ (1 Cor 3.9) They are his creation and part of his plan. God has made them and the love for his own creatures never ceases, even though they are ‘still of the flesh’. But strong hope lies in the people themselves and in the solemn pledge of their perseverance in the Christian Way.

 

“Spiritual life grows as love finds its centre beyond ourselves. Faithful and committed relationships offer a door into the mystery of spiritual life in which we discover that the more we give of self, the richer we become in soul; the more we go beyond ourselves in love, the more we become our true selves and our spiritual beauty may be more fully revealed. It is of course very hard to wean ourselves away from self-centredness. And people can only dream of doing such a thing. For this  hope to be fulfilled it is necessary that a solemn decision be made by us - whatever the difficulties, we are committed to the way of generous love.” 

 

The Rt. Rev’d. Dr. Richard Chartres, former Bishop of London.

 

It is more important than ever, when public debate over serious issues like Brexit is overrun by personalities bearing opinions that are ill conceived and ill-advised or that are charged with more heat than light, that we need to keep our heads. Christians are not airy-fairy thinkers. Our view of life is tempered by the message of Christ which is God’s love for this world and his care for every part of it. For what we are being called to this morning is none other than the complete Christian spiritual life which will always be tested by the world we inhabit.

 

It is to help us, then that Jesus does not speak of God’s love without his own strong vision of a world transformed by that love. Above all he sees human love as God’s transforming agent. He turns the expected order upside down. His beatitudes’ are reserved for the poor, the persecuted and the suffering. Shockingly, Jesus cites the lives of the Old Testament prophets in their cause. They were persecuted and even put to death for the cause of right. Consequently the people of human consequence, serving their own needs before the needs of others are remembered as they have always been looked up to, even in the time of the prophets. In speaking as a prophet himself, Jesus job is to point the way, to describe a world in which God’s Kingdom, which is not quite of this world, is to come into being.

 

The Bishop of London’s Visitation last month concluded at 5 pm with a final meeting in which she echoed the view that the future existence of the Christian Church – its heart - would be more than ever informed and determined by the voices, the stories and the lives of the poor. The poor of this great city of London: economic migrants, coupled with the great diversity of religious, ethnic and social backgrounds and languages bids us in the twenty-first century to love diversity and difference not as a tidy piece of political correctness but as the acceptance of the challenge to love with more heart and more imagination than we ever have before.

 

 

 

 



 

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