Sermon for the Fifth Sunday after Trinity

16th Jul 2017


Sermon for the Fifth Sunday after Trinity Year A

 

“To set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the spirit is life and peace”  Romans 8.5

 

The contrast drawn between flesh and spirit is ancient and certainly not accidental. Language relating to ‘the spirit’ will suggest an invitation to come to know and experience God as a reality. More than ever Christianity finds itself set within a sea of unbelief and is confronted by a whole new generation which remains, by and large, unchurched. Many find the idea of spirituality positive - but mere religion delivers a negative charge. Many baulk against what they call ‘organised religion’ and even those who call themselves Christian-minded, do not necessarily want to go to church. In response to this many clergy choose to ‘dumb down’ Christian services to appeal to the lowest common denominator and offer distraction, emotion and a sense of security. This approach might yield some increase in human numbers but turns out to offer ‘thin’ experience. It satisfies at the ordinary level but does not feed the soul in the longer term. It offers a sense of security and uplift and even ecstatic and emotional experience but its expression is sensual rather than spiritually grounded. It refuses to be confronted by the God who is not biddable.

 

I don’t think any of this is new. The impetus of Jesus’ teaching regarding the sower and the seed is the one which responds to the very real and existent spiritual ambivalence of his day. But it also reminds us of the gift of faith which is as present as the seed is to the sower. Jesus knows at the very least that he is not ‘preaching to the converted’ but to a people whose lives are tough and whose outlook is realistic and who will not be fobbed off by religious platitudes. Having said this they are a people do seek after God, in their own way they have ‘ears to hear’ – they like us, have an instinct for a spiritual teaching which rings true both for their lives and for their understanding of God. The Church in our own time must not ignore the fact that its central task is not to find numerous ways to attract new followers but to teach and to practice the Christian Faith that from the perspective of the spirit rather than the flesh. It must learn once to be a  Church whose actions and outreach emerge out of a contemplative and prayerful base. The pattern of Jesus’ teaching is the one which understands the realities of life but which offers no easy consolation, not a way out but a way through all that comes our way. It is for Christ that the Church sustains its life and this is Good News for all who come to seek God.

 

If the spirit of Him who raised Jesus from the dead dwells in you, He who raised Jesus from the dead will give life to your mortal bodies also through his spirit that dwells in you. Romans 8.11

 

The recourse to the Church is not as a bunker but as turning a key to a door that leads out to new life. A sure pathway has been provided by Pope Francis. It is the one which expresses the never ending presence of God’s mercy. There is a ready acknowledgement here that Christian lives, are not different from any other lives. Christians who have found faith have not been magically relieved of life’s pain and conflict and complexity. Pope Francis found the image of the Virgin who unravels knots a particularly compelling one since it does not simplify our view of the Christian life but makes it more complex and interesting. It acknowledges the many ways in which we experience our own past as a rough, tough terrain which is in sore need of understanding and healing. Our human nature is understood NOT from the starting point of its perfectability but from an understanding of its vulnerability and hence the need for God’s loving mercy. We come to God, we turn to Christ from the starting point of the little that we are and the need we have of understanding and healing. The words from our Gospel ring particularly true That which is of the flesh is death, and that which is of God’s wellspring of mercy is spirit and is life.

 

Paul Vallely’s biography of Pope Francis is entitled ‘Untying the Knots’ and the writing of this biography is not from the point of view of an ascending  scale of achievement but instead sees his life’s ministry as a flawed one in which grave mistakes have been made and owned. Pope Francis admits to all this in a spirit of repentance, sure in the mercy of God, and ready to come to God each day as a Christian who is both penitent, and as the hymn says, ‘ransomed, healed, restored and forgiven’. Refreshed and healed. Made new to serve Him. The ancient breach between the flesh and the spirit is being healed through Christ’s merciful future providing love.

We are being called to set our minds on that which is of the Spirit, and which brings life.

 

The parable of the sower and the seed is a reminder that the Word of God comes to the individual’s often faltering Christian faith in a rough, tough human environment. The seed of Christian Faith, planted in human hearts, is the one which, in the face of the dead hand of atheism and the sure measurements of social science, stands for lives which may find a real feeding and a real meaning from their very source, God himself.

 

 

From the Didache (1st Century)

 

Father, we thank Thee Who has planted

Thy holy name within our hearts.

Knowledge and faith and life immortal

Jesus Thy Son to us imparts.

Thou, Lord, didst make all for Thy pleasure,

Didst give man food for all his days,

Giving in Christ the bread eternal;

Thine is the pow'r, be Thine the praise.

 

Watch o'er Thy Church, O Lord, in mercy,

Save it from evil, guard it still,

Perfect it in love, unite it,

Cleansed and conformed unto Thy will.

As grain, once scattered on the hillsides,

Was in this broken bread made one,

So from all lands Thy church be gathered

Into Thy kingdom by Thy Son.