Sermon for the Fourth Sunday after Trinity
Posted on the 9th Jul 2017 in the category Wedding Video


Fourth Sunday of Trinity  Year A

 

Matthew 11:25-30

 

Three lessons can be learned from today’s Gospel: three qualities our Blessed Lord seeks in those who would be his followers. Jesus looks for simplicity, he looks for faith, and he looks for trust. It’s clear that he values simplicity in his disciples when he says, "I give praise to you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, for you have hidden these things from the wise and the learned and have revealed them to little children. Yes, Father, such has been your gracious will." God’s grace is given in humility: simplicity of heart and mind. This is the foundation of our understanding of the nature of God in relation to us his creatures.

 

Gentle Jesus meek and mild

Look upon a little child

Pity my simplicity

                                Suffer me to come to thee.     Charles Wesley.

 

The event which was the occasion for this remark of Jesus was the return of the 70 disciples after they had been sent by the Lord to preach the Gospel, to heal the sick and to cast out demons. They were ordinary folk like you and me; but in all simplicity, they opened their hearts to God’s grace, allowing him to work through them, so that his mercy might be made manifest in healing. When they returned, full of wonderful stories of success. "Lord, even the demons are subject to us in your name!" Jesus gives praise to the Father for revealing his power through them and the effectiveness of their witness. True simplicity is not only for those who live in humble circumstances. Simplicity is an attitude of mind. It means wearing your gifts and talents lightly, ascribing all that you have to the goodness and providence of God with a thankful heart and a spirit that knows peace. In this lies are true freedom, for without this we remain ungrateful or as one hymn puts it “frail earthen vessels and things of no worth”. We have been made in God’s image and we reflect that image in our own readiness to be open and seeing and hearing and in our dealings with others. In short, this means imitating the humility of Jesus as he is described by the prophet Zechariah in today’s first reading: "See, your king shall come to you; a just savior is he, Meek, and riding on an ass, on a colt, the foal of an ass." It means that we return to the old Sunday School him and find in the gentle and meek Jesus that docility of spirit whose mind and heart is listening and alert and in essence, receptive. And so St Paul can say that this is a garment we must wear:

 

Put on therefore, as God's elect, holy and beloved, a heart of compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, longsuffering… Colossians 3.12.

 

Our Gospel reveals that Christ looks also for faith in his followers. He makes a tremendous claim in this passage. He claims to be the Son of God: "All things have been handed over to me by my Father. No one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son wishes to reveal him." Nowhere does Jesus make a greater claim than this. It is a sublime truth that the man Christ Jesus is in fact God the Son, the second Person of the Most Holy Trinity. But to receive this truth requires the gift of faith: no one can know this unique relationship between God the Father and his only-begotten Son except those "to whom the Son chooses to reveal him." I always find hymns very encouraging, and particularly the singing of hymns, and even more particularly my favourite hymns are those which express something of our own unknowing in the face of the greatness of God. “How shall I sing that Majesty”, “Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise”, “Jerusalem the Golden” and others have all been written to express the strong sense of our own unknowing. But this is not a place where all hope and longing is evacuated. No, in the faith of Christ our hope and our longing is mixed and merged with what in God we know and what we cannot know. Faith makes it possible, but not just faith alone, blind faith, but faith in and through Our Lord Jesus Christ and in and through his promise of mercy.

 

The Lord Jesus also looks for trust. He wants us to trust him enough to give him our burdens and to receive his refreshment in return: "Come to me, all you who labor and are burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am meek and humble of heart; and you will find rest for yourselves. For my yoke is easy, and my burden light."

 

This image of a yoke is a very beautiful one. A "yoke of oxen" was always a pair of animals joined together by a smoothly shaped piece of wood. This was the yoke. It was placed on the shoulders of the animals and fastened under their necks. By means of this simple apparatus, two oxen (with minds of their own) could work together, accomplishing with half the effort a difficult job such as plowing a field or pulling a heavy load. Typically, the two beasts of burden would be matched in strength and temperament and share the burden together. The yoke is that which is emblematic of a burden shared “bare one anthers burdens and so fulfil the law of Christ”. In this we adopt the servant’s role, and the gentleness and meekness, especially in the face of human antagonism or resentment if transforming of relationships because it is a transforming of their understanding.

 

Today, once again, we hear this generous invitation from our Blessed Lord: Learn from me to be simple, "for I am meek and humble of heart." Learn from me to have faith, because I have revealed my Father to you. And learn from me to trust, because "my yoke is easy and my burden is light." Let us then learn these things, that we may fulfil the great words of St Augustine “Thou hast made us for thyself, and our hearts are restless ‘til they find their rest in thee’.